concu

Childhood Concussions: The Basics

According to the Mayo clinic, “a concussion is a traumatic brain injury that alters the way your brain functions. Effects are usually temporary but can include headaches and problems with concentration, memory, balance, and coordination.”

Any blow to the head or upper body can result in a concussion including but not limited to: physical altercations or fights, playground injuries, car accidents, bicycle accidents, falling down the stairs, or other falls.

When considering sports for your child to participate in, remember that not all sports include physical contact, but all sports do have the potential to result in a concussion. It’s important to know the signs and potential damage.

It’s important to know the signs of a concussion. It’s common for a blow to the head to result in a concussion, while not always causing a loss of consciousness. Many will claim to feel “fine” not being aware that they are dealing with a concussion so it’s important to know the typical signs:
– Loss of consciousness
– Memory problems
– Severe Headache
– Blurred vision
– Trouble walking
– Confusion and saying things that don’t make sense
– Slurred speech
– Drowsiness or feeling sluggish
– Unresponsiveness
– Sensitivity to light or sound.

These symptoms are a sign of a possible concussion and anyone displaying any of the above symptoms after a blow to the head or upper body should be taken immediately for examination by DeMoss Chiropractic or other healthcare professional.

We’re trained in how to gently and properly adjust a child’s spine. While a blow to the head or neck may not actually cause a concussion, it very well may have created a slight misalignment to the vertebra in the spine resulting a vertebral subluxation (nerve interference that can interrupt the signal from the brain that goes down the spinal cord and out to the muscles, organs and glads.)